For Fest: BlackCatfishMusketeer (Edinburgh review)

It sounds like every other modern love story: two people meet online and fall in love. But this beautiful, bumbling three-hander leapfrogs over other couples to dig its way into your heart. It runs wildly, whacking the opponents with a…

For Fest: Edison (Edinburgh review)

Locating the historic tussle between inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla in an Orwellian dystopia, this cracked history gets lost in a sea of glitter. In an alternative past, a determined Tesla (Zoe Feldman) is robotically manipulated by a demonic…

For Fest: Americana Psychobabble (Edinburgh review)

The progression of this show is not dissimilar to those nights when a friend gets blind drunk, starts a rambling story that never reaches its conclusion, gets very intimate and finally ends up in a corner crying. At a certain…

For Fest: Dickless (Edinburgh review)

Dickless delights in misanthropy. Lauren Downie and Tessa Jane Fairey take turns at performing Aisha Josiah’s one-woman play. Her characters are a playground to swing across, and Josiah arms them artfully, quips and pint in hand. Saff has a lack of…

For Fest: DIGS (Edinburgh review)

On the back wall of the theatre are a mass of jumbled fairy lights. Like the lives of people in shared spaces, they are messily, inseparably tangled. Jess Murrain and Lucy Bairstow present a series of duos struggling with limited…

For Fest: Gazing at a Distant Star (Edinburgh review)

Siân Rowland’s three-hander boldly tries to unpick complex modern situations, but falls short, leaving underdeveloped characters struggling with subjects too big for them to carry. From the tip of the pencil to the little lies told, everything in Gazing at a…

Jamie MacDowell and Tom Thum (Edinburgh review)

                      Tom Thum’s voice is a symphony orchestra. With a bass low enough to shake the seats and a falsetto high enough that glass breaking is not unimaginable, his beatboxing…

For Fest: Bare Skin on Briny Waters (Edinburgh review)

Delicately woven together, the stories of Annie (Charlie Sellers) and Sophie (Maureen Lennon) unravel like a salty lullaby. With their melancholic monologues underscored by live folk music—played by Mortiboy who sits centre stage, watching the action unfold—Hull-based company Bellow Theatre…

For Fest: Goody (Edinburgh review)

The only redeeming feature of this play is the strength of Lucy Roslyn’s legs. Keeping the pose of chimpanzee Goody for an hour, Roslyn bounces and clambers around the stage, doing all she can to make the audience laugh as…

For Fest: Arm- Mireille & Mathieu (Edinburgh review)

Tattered dolls and cuddly toys are scattered around the room, inanimate until they grab the hungry attention of double act Mireille and Mathieu. Performing in a mixture of English, French and garbled nonsense, these riotous performers are just big kids.…

For Most Mira: An open wound- Living memories of the Bosnian conflict

When talking about war, it is often the numbers that are recited. How many thousands died here; how many hundreds were buried there; how many were tortured or raped or shot so close to your own home. But it is…