For Fest: Mies Julie (Edinburgh review)

                            Yaël Farber’s thrumming production returns to the Fringe after it first stalked the stage in 2012. Creating a vivid, bloody drama of race and class, August…

For Fest: A Girl and a Gun (Edinburgh review)

We watch as a movie is made. Orwin plays Her, a seductress whose every action is for Him, played by a different member of the audience each night. Dressed as a cowboy, he is the star of the show. He…

For Fest: Amy Conway’s SuperAwesome World (Edinburgh review)

In Amy Conway’s personal, personable show, she draws together her love of video games and the reality of depression, trying to understand them in conjunction with each other. How is Mario always happy even if he’s just fallen into a…

For Exeunt: Anyone’s Guess How We Got Here (Edinburgh review)

A sledgehammer swings into flaming rubble. Darkness pours down her. A body. A rustle in the corner. A gap in the fence and a word between the line. They drive away and we don’t see them fall. Anyone’s Guess is a ghost…

For Fest: BlackCatfishMusketeer (Edinburgh review)

It sounds like every other modern love story: two people meet online and fall in love. But this beautiful, bumbling three-hander leapfrogs over other couples to dig its way into your heart. It runs wildly, whacking the opponents with a…

For Fest: Edison (Edinburgh review)

Locating the historic tussle between inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla in an Orwellian dystopia, this cracked history gets lost in a sea of glitter. In an alternative past, a determined Tesla (Zoe Feldman) is robotically manipulated by a demonic…

For Fest: Americana Psychobabble (Edinburgh review)

The progression of this show is not dissimilar to those nights when a friend gets blind drunk, starts a rambling story that never reaches its conclusion, gets very intimate and finally ends up in a corner crying. At a certain…

For Fest: Dickless (Edinburgh review)

Dickless delights in misanthropy. Lauren Downie and Tessa Jane Fairey take turns at performing Aisha Josiah’s one-woman play. Her characters are a playground to swing across, and Josiah arms them artfully, quips and pint in hand. Saff has a lack of…

For Fest: DIGS (Edinburgh review)

On the back wall of the theatre are a mass of jumbled fairy lights. Like the lives of people in shared spaces, they are messily, inseparably tangled. Jess Murrain and Lucy Bairstow present a series of duos struggling with limited…

For Fest: Gazing at a Distant Star (Edinburgh review)

Siân Rowland’s three-hander boldly tries to unpick complex modern situations, but falls short, leaving underdeveloped characters struggling with subjects too big for them to carry. From the tip of the pencil to the little lies told, everything in Gazing at a…

Jamie MacDowell and Tom Thum (Edinburgh review)

                      Tom Thum’s voice is a symphony orchestra. With a bass low enough to shake the seats and a falsetto high enough that glass breaking is not unimaginable, his beatboxing…