Murdo Macleod / The Guardian

Daughter caused chaos at the fringe in 2018. A lot of people hated it. I loved it. When I spoke to Lazarus about the controversy, he was really thoughtful. He was very clear that the show is not for everyone, and it can be incredibly hard to watch.

” The hardest responses to reconcile are from the people – primarily women – who have been hurt by the performance. “I don’t think everyone needs to see the show,” Lazarus says frankly, when I ask about those who reported crying in the toilets afterwards, wishing they hadn’t seen it. “The show picks at a scab and if you have a trauma or a trigger that’s in there, it’s gonna peel really bad. I don’t know how to prepare people for that.” After every performance the company hold a space to talk, led by producer Aislinn Rose. Lazarus doesn’t attend those sessions; audiences feel more comfortable without him.”

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“Charlotte has always said: ‘If Paines Plough ever comes up, we’re going to go for it and we’re going to get it.’ I think she just knew.” Because two artistic directors ran the company previously, it set an expectation that a job share could be possible. “There’s this old idea of artistic director as rockstar,” Bennett says. “But the idea of a singular vision is not something I buy into.” As a pair, Posner says: “You’re scrutinising things through two lenses. You’re challenging each other all the time in a really healthy way.”

For The Stage, I spoke to Katie Posner and Charlotte Bennett about their aims and ambitions for Paines Plough.

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Linda Nylind / The Guardian

I really enjoyed talking to Jessica Hynes about her part in Churchill’s Far Away. Over a lunch of slurpy noodles, we discussed hope and violence, both in our time and in that of the play.

Far Away is sharply, horrifically resonant now, and only takes half an hour to read. Highly recommend it. It’s of a rare breed of play that reads as well as it performs.

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